I gave up on the idea of becoming a famous singer. Perhaps exactly because I’m no longer burdened by that dream, now I grab every opportunity to sing

Drugi jezik na kojem je dostupan ovaj članak: Bosnian

Dreamer: Branimir Brkljač, Terra Panonica, Mokrin (Vojvodina)

My favourite childhood dream?

The most common theme of childhood dreams is “When I grow up …”. My dream was that I would be a lawyer who would fight for justice, and that with my fiery speeches I would dismantle the indictments against innocents.

What I dreamt of when I was entering the world of advertising?

I never dreamt of entering the world of marketing. I was literally pulled into it, and I can honestly say it was against my will. Several very specific people are responsible for this, and I will always be grateful to them for it. Only when I entered this world, I began to dream – and dream big. And what else could I do when the first episode of that film I played in had the title Looks funny but it works. Since then, I have performed in different roles and in stories with different strings in this world, but the title of each new episode has remained the same.

Which dream led me to where I am today?

A dream can move you, but it can’t take you anywhere. I was brought here where I am today by work and dedication to the idea that success is possible even when you work in a marginal industry, on a marginal market, constantly facing ridicule and contempt. Truth be told, such approach was greatly assisted by the fact that I saw no other alternative at the time. Then, each mistake becomes a reward, and each defeat a new lesson. An idea not followed by patient and persistent work is an illusion. But also, if a dream is not the driving force and motivation for what we are doing, then such work is a nightmare. That is why it is important to make the distinction between the dream and the daydreaming.

Was the Mokrin House initially a dream?

Of course! If it wasn’t a dream, then just another village house in one of the dying villages of Banat could not have become the Mokrin House. The story of this house in Mokrin is a once in a lifetime experience. It was, and still is, a journey on which dreams and reality are interchangeable, and you’re never sure what is what and where you are at a certain moment. Is it a hallucination, or are you really standing in the middle of a dying, neglected village of Banat, speaking with people from Brighton, Berlin and Bihać, while a woman from Catalonia sits next to you, teaching Chinese people English via Skype, while a bloke from Sydney is flying his drone, recording something for his YouTube channel. At the same time, in front of the building where you are standing and talking, a team from an international company is having their own team building workshop. A little later, together with all of them, you will enjoy some local cheese and schnapps, listening to an IT guy from LA who delightedly talks about a successful ICO he launched for a new cryptocurrency. That very moment, your neighbour starts with the evening milking of cows and cleaning of the barn, to the rhythm of Ceca’s song Moj Beograde (famous folk singer). In the evening, people from Mokrin come to the house, and together with the current ‘tenants’, they watch a movie in the evening on the outdoor screen. Or they all practice waltz, depending on what is planned for the evening. Is it dream or reality? Whatever it is – just let it last.

What I dream of today?

That’s something I can’t reveal, because then it would no longer be just a dream, it would become a commitment of sorts. And some things are better left just as dreams.

Do I dream more awake or asleep?

I prefer daydreaming, because it seems to me that I can fulfil those dreams more easily, and I can immediately start living them. Or am I just dreaming that it is so…

Are there any dreams I gave up on?

I gave up on the idea of becoming a famous singer. Perhaps exactly because I’m no longer burdened by that dream, now I grab every opportunity to sing.